What to watch for developers, ML enthusiasts, and hackers

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Photo by Estée Janssens on Unsplash

Here at ShiftLeft, we are gearing up for Shifting Left: ’21, a one-day application security conference for developers and security practitioners on Jan 28, 2021. I’ve been a huge fan of security conferences ever since I attended my first security conference, NorthSec in Montreal. This time, I am excited to be on the organizer’s side and present this conference to you.

Shifting Left: ‘21 is entirely online and free to register here. Now let’s get into it! …


Why I Joined SAST company ShiftLeft

Most of you know me as an offensive security gal. The fact that I decided to join a SAST team frankly surprised me as well. Now that I have officially started my job at ShiftLeft, I am taking this moment to reflect on how I got here and how I see the future of application security.

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Confessions of a newbie web developer

I started my career as a web developer. And I absolutely loved it! I loved building tools that solve someone else’s problems. And there is no feeling like seeing your vision materialize right in front of your eyes.

I developed many applications used by medical professionals. And my apps were often handling sensitive information of children and patients. So security was always at the back of my mind. I wanted to protect my users’ data but had no idea how to secure an application. Learning about application security felt overwhelming. …


And how to protect your network from attackers

Fortress door
Fortress door
Photo by Ivan Aleksic on Unsplash

Successful cyberattacks often start at the “network perimeter.”

As a company grows, it becomes increasingly difficult to secure the hundreds and thousands of machines on the network. Often, all an attacker needs to compromise a network is a single bug on a public-facing machine! Today, we will talk about a common vulnerability on the network perimeter: SSRF, how it allows attackers to pivot into a company’s network, and how to prevent it.

What Is SSRF?

SSRF, or Server-Side Request Forgery, is a vulnerability that happens when an attacker can send requests on behalf of a server. It allows attackers to “forge” the request signatures of the vulnerable server, therefore assuming a privileged position on a network, bypassing firewall controls, and gaining access to internal services. …


When attackers can execute their code on your machine

Computer chair in front of computer displaying code
Computer chair in front of computer displaying code
Photo by Kevin Horvat on Unsplash

Remote code execution vulnerabilities are a class of vulnerabilities that happen when attackers can execute their code on your machine. One of the ways this can happen is through command injection vulnerabilities. They are a type of remote code execution that happens when user input is concatenated directly into a system command.

Let’s say that your site has a functionality that allows users to download a remote file and view it on your website. To achieve this functionality, your application uses the system command wget to download the remote file.

This is what your python source code looks like. The os.system() Python function executes its input string as a system command. …


How attackers use Insecure Direct Object References to access data illegally

Data in the shape of a heart
Data in the shape of a heart
Photo by Alexander Sinn on Unsplash.

Have you ever wondered how data breaches happen?

Nowadays, it seems like a new company is breached every five minutes. But how exactly do these breaches happen? How do hackers get their hands on sensitive data? In this article, we’ll talk about a simple yet very impactful vulnerability that attackers often use to gain access to confidential data: IDOR.

What Is IDOR?

IDOR stands for “Insecure Direct Object Reference.” Despite the long and intimidating name, IDOR is actually a straightforward vulnerability to understand. Essentially, IDOR is missing access control.

Let’s say example.com is a social media site that allows you to chat with other users. And when you signed up, you noticed that your user ID on the website is 1234. This website has a page that allows you to view all your messages with your friends. When you click on the “View Your Messages” button located on the homepage, you get redirected to this URL, where you can see all your chat messages with your friends on the…


Linux privilege escalation by exploiting a wildcard injection

computer screen showing code
computer screen showing code
Photo by Sai Kiran Anagani on Unsplash

Welcome back to the Linux Security Series! In this series, we’ll discuss security issues that affect Linux systems and common misconfigurations that lead to them. Let’s get started!

Privilege escalation is a way that attackers can escalate their privileges on a system. For example, let’s say that an attacker has gained access to your web server, but only as a low-privileged user. They cannot read or write sensitive files, execute scripts, or change system configuration. How could they compromise your server and maintain their access there?

If they can find a way to trick the system into thinking that they are the root user, the attacker can carry out more powerful attacks, like reading and writing sensitive files and inserting permanent backdoors into the system. And this is where privilege escalation comes in. Today, let’s talk about how attackers can exploit wildcard injections to escalate their privileges. …


Linux privilege escalation by exploiting a misconfigured PATH variable

Coding in the dark
Coding in the dark
Photo by Kevin Horvat on Unsplash.

Welcome back to the Linux Security Series! In this series, we’ll discuss security issues that affect Linux systems and common misconfigurations that lead to them. Let’s get started!

Privilege escalation is a way that attackers can escalate their privileges on a system. For example, let’s say that an attacker has gained access to your web server, but only as a low-privileged user. They cannot read or write sensitive files, execute scripts, or change system configuration. How could they compromise your server and maintain their access there?

If they can find a way to trick the system into thinking that they are the root user, the attacker can carry out more powerful attacks like reading and writing sensitive files and inserting permanent backdoors into the system. …


Linux privilege escalation by exploiting SUDO rights

Superman action figure
Superman action figure
Photo by Yogi Purnama on Unsplash.

Welcome back to the Linux Security Series! In this series, we’ll discuss security issues that affect Linux systems and common misconfigurations that lead to them. Let’s get started!

Privilege escalation is a way that attackers can escalate their privileges on a system. For example, let’s say that an attacker has gained access to your web server, but only as a low-privileged user. They cannot read or write sensitive files, execute scripts, or change system configuration. How could they compromise your server and maintain their access there?

If they can find a way to trick the system into thinking that they are the root user, the attacker can carry out more powerful attacks like reading and writing sensitive files and inserting permanent backdoors into the system. …


Linux privilege escalation by exploiting an overprivileged process

Man jumping over a cliff in the desert
Man jumping over a cliff in the desert
Photo by Alex Radelich on Unsplash.

Welcome back to the Linux Security Series! In this series, we’ll discuss security issues that affect Linux systems and common misconfigurations that lead to them. Let’s get started!

Privilege escalation is a way that attackers can escalate their privileges on a system. For example, let’s say that an attacker has gained access to your web server, but only as a low-privileged user. They cannot read or write sensitive files, execute scripts, or change system configuration. How could they compromise your server and maintain their access there?

If they can find a way to trick the system into thinking that they are the root user, the attacker can carry out more powerful attacks like reading and writing sensitive files and inserting permanent backdoors into the system. …


How attackers inject into SQL queries and how you can prevent it

computer monitor with code on the screen
computer monitor with code on the screen
Photo by Caspar Camille Rubin on Unsplash

Let’s talk about one of the most severe vulnerabilities that can happen to your application: SQL injections.

SQL injections allow attacker code to change the structure of your application’s SQL queries to steal data, modify data, or potentially execute arbitrary commands in the underlying operating system.

For example, let’s say that your web application’s database contains a table called Users. This table contains three columns: Id, Username, and Password, which respectively contain the user ID, username, and password of each registered user.

About

Vickie Li

Professional investigator of nerdy stuff. Hacks and secures. Creates god awful infographics. https://twitter.com/vickieli7

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